New renewable energy possibilities found in cows' stomachs

Scottish scientists discover key enzyme for biofuel production already exists in cow's digestive systems

25th July 2011

Scottish scientists discover key enzyme for biofuel production already exists in cow's digestive systems

In the race for alternative and renewable energy solutions, a team of Scottish scientists has discovered how nature may already have the answer; their discovery could provide greener industry development and comes from the complex digestive system of the cow.

Life sciences company Ingenza, the ARK-Genomics facility of the Roslin Institute and Professor John Wallace (of the Rowett Institute) are leading research into how enzymes from the microbes that live in the stomachs of cattle and other ruminants, could be used in industry to break down the tough structures of waste plant and tree matter.

“People have been trying to unlock the energy in plant and tree matter for years, but our approach recognises how nature has already successfully done it” Dr. Ian Fotheringham, President of Ingenza has stated. He also stated, “the possibilities for more sustainable and renewable industrial practices are enormous” as a result of this discovery. For more information click here

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