Meet Adam’s chickens on Countryfile this Sunday

This Sunday Countryfile is in the heart of England on the beautiful borderland of the Black Country.

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This Sunday Countryfile is in the heart of England on the beautiful borderland of the Black Country, where Matt Baker explores two of the most important 18th-century English gardens – Hagley Park and the Leasowes, both of which are going through major restoration projects. He discovers the history of the great men behind the gardens, George Lyttelton and William Shenstone and gets stuck in restoring the cascades at Hagley Park. With a little help from Ellie Harrison he adds the finishing touches by releasing 100 golden rudd into the lake.

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Ellie explores the mysterious Kinver Rock Houses. Inhabited right up to the 1960s, they are now a haven for wildlife. She also discovers how the rich geology of the area sparked the onset of the Industrial Revolution. Meanwhile, Adam Henson‘s competitive streak comes to the fore when he and his son Alfie take their poultry to the Cheshire Show.

Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the greatest threats to modern human health. Charlotte Smith investigates whether giving medication to farm animals is making the problem worse.

We’ll be live tweeting during the show – join us over on Twitter by following @Countryfilemag and using the hashtag #Countryfile. 

Here’s a roundup of our favourite days out in the West Midlands. 

Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire

Julia Bradbury explores the remains of a castle that endured one of the longest sieges in English history.

Malvern Hills, Worcestershire

Gaze out over a landscape that sparked the imagination of composer Edward Elgar.

Worcester and Birmingham canal

Follow a gentle water route through the beautiful landscape at the centre of England.

Shrewsbury, Shropshire

The cobbled streets of this ancient market town hold many dark, ghostly secrets that only the brave dare discover.

Ragley Hall, Warwickshire

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Discover the perfect example of an English stately home, which has been in the same family for 300 years.