Visit Hayfield: Places to stay, things to do

Spirit yourself away to the Peak District for some autumnal rural fun. Nick Peers gets the windcheater and walking boots packed

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Why go there?
Hayfield has long been considered the gateway to the High Peak region of the Peak District, and sits in the shadow of the area’s only mountain, Kinder Scout. It was here that ramblers staged a mass trespass in 1932 as part of a campaign to open up more of the countryside to public access.
Although evidence of habitation goes back to Roman times (the village grew up on a Roman road), Hayfield didn’t expand until the 19th century, when it became a centre for the cotton industry. It’s since shrank back to the size of a large village, and is the perfect base for ramblers wishing to explore the western edge of the Peak District. For a stunning 360 degree view of seven local counties, head up to Lantern Pike, or if you want something less arduous, indulge in a spot of horse riding or cycling down the Sett Valley Trail
 
Where to stay
The George is Hayfield’s oldest hotel, its building date back to the 16th century. Single occupancy is £40 per night, and a double is £60 per night for the room, including breakfast. The hotel can also prepare packed lunches for your walk, and serves a full lunch and evening menu, plus serves a selection of real ales to help you unwind at the end of a long day.
 
Where to eat

The Royal Hotel dominates the centre of Hayfield, and offers the perfect place to retreat to from the cold autumnal evenings. Go for more traditional pub fare in the Windsor Bar, or visit the Dining Room for an a la carte menu. 

Tell us a local secret
Arthur Lowe, best known for his role as Captain Mainwaring in Dad’s Army, was born in the village in 1915. In 1976 he helped the local cricket club raise the £5,000 necessary to purchase its own ground.
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