Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey

Explore magical Llanddwyn Island and the sand dunes of Newborough Warren on this family walk
in Anglesey

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Anglesey is an ideal family destination, and the enchanting Llanddwyn Island and Newborough Warren present many exciting opportunities for children to explore sand dunes and learn about the history and mythology of the area.

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Take the left-hand path out of the Forestry Commission car park then, after 100m, turn right down a forest track. Follow the path for a mile then take the first track on the right. Soon views open out towards the village of Malltraeth (the English translation is Rotting Shore!) and the Bodorgan headland.

You can still make out the outline of the cob, which was originally constructed between 1790 and 1820. The estuary and salt marsh form vital habitats for a number of bird species.

Follow the path along the rough ground close to the forest edge. After 2 miles the track reaches the edge of the dunes; bear right to the beach and cross the headland of Traeth Penrhos to Llanddwyn Island. Where the beach meets the island look out for pillow lavas – these were caused when lava erupted under the Iapetus ocean that covered Wales between 400-600 million years ago.

Llanddwyn Island is part of the Newborough Warren Nature Reserve and you are advised to stay on the paths at all times. The most spectacular path on the island follows the coastline, with views towards Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula.

The name Llanddwyn means the Church of St Dwynwen, and is named after the patron saint of Welsh lovers. St Dwynwen lived in the fifth century and was one of St Brychan’s 24 daughters. She fell in love with a prince but unfortunately her father had arranged for her to marry another. She prayed to be released from the unhappy love and dreamt she was given a potion that turned her lover into ice.

She then made three wishes: that her lover be revived, that all true lovers find happiness and that she should never again be married. She then retreated to Llanddwyn to live the life of a hermit. The site of St Dwynwen’s original church was built in the 16th century and the remains of this church are still standing.

After exploring the island, turn right on to Llanddwyn Bay, past the freestanding rocks, and enter the forest on the Anglesey coast path. Follow the waymarkers through the dunes to a path and then a tarmac track and turn left. Follow this track back towards the car park. Keep your eyes peeled for rare plants, including a number of orchid species. If you are quiet and lucky enough you may also spot red squirrels.

After 2½ miles cut across to the estuary at the marker post 34, on a path that runs between the edge of the woodland and the estuary, and follow it as it winds over boardwalks to a coast path waymarker, which will lead you back to the car park.

Anglesey is an ideal family destination, and the enchanting Llanddwyn Island and Newborough Warren present many exciting opportunities for children to explore sand dunes and learn about the history and mythology of the area.

Take the left-hand path out of the Forestry Commission car park then, after 100m, turn right down a forest track. Follow the path for a mile then take the first track on the right. Soon views open out towards the village of Malltraeth (the English translation is Rotting Shore!) and the Bodorgan headland.

You can still make out the outline of the cob, which was originally constructed between 1790 and 1820. The estuary and salt marsh form vital habitats for a number of bird species.

Follow the path along the rough ground close to the forest edge. After 2 miles the track reaches the edge of the dunes; bear right to the beach and cross the headland of Traeth Penrhos to Llanddwyn Island. Where the beach meets the island look out for pillow lavas – these were caused when lava erupted under the Iapetus ocean that covered Wales between 400-600 million years ago.

Llanddwyn Island is part of the Newborough Warren Nature Reserve and you are advised to stay on the paths at all times. The most spectacular path on the island follows the coastline, with views towards Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula.

The name Llanddwyn means the Church of St Dwynwen, and is named after the patron saint of Welsh lovers. St Dwynwen lived in the fifth century and was one of St Brychan’s 24 daughters. She fell in love with a prince but unfortunately her father had arranged for her to marry another. She prayed to be released from the unhappy love and dreamt she was given a potion that turned her lover into ice.

She then made three wishes: that her lover be revived, that all true lovers find happiness and that she should never again be married. She then retreated to Llanddwyn to live the life of a hermit. The site of St Dwynwen’s original church was built in the 16th century and the remains of this church are still standing.

After exploring the island, turn right on to Llanddwyn Bay, past the freestanding rocks, and enter the forest on the Anglesey coast path. Follow the waymarkers through the dunes to a path and then a tarmac track and turn left. Follow this track back towards the car park. Keep your eyes peeled for rare plants, including a number of orchid species. If you are quiet and lucky enough you may also spot red squirrels.

After 2½ miles cut across to the estuary at the marker post 34, on a path that runs between the edge of the woodland and the estuary, and follow it as it winds over boardwalks to a coast path waymarker, which will lead you back to the car park.

Useful Information

Terrain

Forest paths and tracks and two short sections on road. The section on dunes is challenging. Rough paths and stiles make this unsuitable for buggies. The whole of the walk is within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

How to get there

by car: Newborough is 14 miles southeast of Bangor on the A4080, then unclassified roads. Park at the Forestry Commission car park just off the A4080 at the start of the Cob to the northwest of Newborough.

By public transport:

Regular trains run to Bangor from Chester and the rest of the UK. Bus number 42 runs from Bangor to Newborough then on to Aberffraw and Llangefni, which links in with Lon Las Cefni cycle track,  giving you the option to park at Llangefni and cycle there and back.

Refreshments

Hooton’s Homegrown, Gwydryn Hir, Brynsiencyn, Anglesey LL61 6HQ

% 01248 430344

hootonshomegrown.com

Map

Ordnance Survey Explorer Map 263.
Grid ref: SH 411 671

Nearby excursions

Anglesey Sea Zoo Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
LL61 6TQ

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www.angleseyseazoo.co.uk

More info

Visit Wales

www.visitwales.co.uk

Visit Anglesey

www.visitanglesey.co.uk

Tourist Information Centres

Llanfairpwll

% 01248 713177

Holyhead

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