5 beautiful wildflower meadows to visit this summer

Visit a meadow this summer and enjoy beautiful wildflowers

A summer meadow of wild flowers. (Photo by: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

1) Greena Moor, Cornwall

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Greena Moor near the village of Week St. Mary is one of the last remaining areas of culm grassland in North Cornwall. This distinctive habitat hosts a wide range of flora, especially those adapted to thrive in waterlogged conditions. Species to spot include; ragged-robin and whorled caraway. http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/reserves/greena-moor-creddacott-meadows  

2) Hartington Meadow, Derbyshire

Throughout summer the meadows of Hartington are bursting with the colour of wildflowers. The grasslands are managed as part of a working farm and regular hay cutting encourages a huge variety of plants. A disused limestone quarry also provides the ideal environment for various orchid species and even some cliff-nesting birds. http://www.derbyshirewildlifetrust.org.uk/reserves/hartington-meadows

3) Muker Meadow, Yorkshire Dales

The Muker area offers one of the best examples of upland hay meadows and was named one of the sixty ‘coronation meadows’ by HRH the Prince of Wales in 2013. All the meadows are rich in wildflowers and grasses, and some of the species even provide the donor stock for land restoration projects in the area. Interesting flora to look out for include the Pignut, Lady’s Mantles and Melancholy Thistle. http://www.ydmt.org/meadow-details-muker-swaledale-16142

4) Marden Meadow, Kent

Located between Marden and Staplehurst, this idyllic reserve represents a classic hay meadow. Marden meadow is considered a British gem and is teeming with daisies, vetches and wild grasses. There are also two ponds where you can find an abundant show of water violet and many other interesting aquatic plants. http://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/reserves/marden-meadow

5) Stockings Meadow, Herefordshire

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Previously this meadow was woodland that was cleared for agriculture, leaving the land covered in tree stumps or ‘stocks’. Today, there is a great diversity of floral species in both the meadow and old hedgerows that surround it. The common spotted orchid and heath orchid can be seen here, but if you’re lucky you might spot a hybrid of the two. http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/reserves/stockings-meadow