Best walks in Snowdonia

Packed with great mountain climbs, idyllic river walks, lakeside rambles and coastal hikes, Snowdonia National Park is the perfect getaway location for hiking – our pick of the best walks in Snowdonia

Barmouth

Snowdonia National Park covers 823 square miles of north-west Wales and contains the country’s highest peak, Snowdon.

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The region, designated as a national park in 1951, was sculpted by glaciers, leaving behind a spectacular landscape of craggy mountains and hills, deep valleys and over 100 lakes.

The mountains around Llyn Idwal in northern Snowdonia
The mountains around Llyn Idwal in northern Snowdonia ©Getty

There are numerous ways to explore the park – mountain biking routes, driving tours and even by canoe – but for a truly immersive experience, why not take on one of Snowdonia’s best walks? Here’s our list of some of the most inspiring, from a classic Snowdon ascent to a less-gruelling riverside amble along the Afon Artro.

1. Rhosgadfan, Gwynedd

Ellyn Cwellyn and Mynydd Mawr in north-west Snowdonia
Ellyn Cwellyn and Mynydd Mawr in north-west Snowdonia ©Alamy

Enjoy this nine-mile mountain walk through open hills and slate quarries in the Snowdonia National Park. Map and route.

2. Yr Eifl, Llyn Peninsula, Gwynedd

Looking north at Yr Eifl and the Llyn Peninsula
Looking north at Yr Eifl and the Llyn Peninsula ©Alamy

A three-hour loop walk above the verdant valleys of the Llyn Peninsula and on to the crown of Yr Eifl with views of the Menai Strait. Map and route.

3. Mawddach Estuary, Gwynedd

Barmouth Bridge over Mawddach Estuary
Barmouth Bridge over Mawddach Estuary ©Getty

Savour the beautiful scenery on this 10-mile walk to the stunning Cregennen Lakes in the foothills of Cader Idris in Snowdonia National Park. Route and map.

4. Llanbedr Woods, Gwynedd

The Afon Artro is 4.5 miles long
The Afon Artro is 4.5 miles long ©Getty

Pass through this ancient woodland teeming with wildlife in north-west Wales. This walk is especially glorious in late summer and autumn when the woods are filled with colour and foraging creatures. Map and route.

5. Snowdon, Gwynedd

Snowdon summit in snow
Snowdon summit in snow ©Getty

Take on the peaks and crags of Snowdon and immerse yourself in what is one of the wildest places in Wales with this seven-mile mountain walk. Map and route.

6. Llyn Tegid, Gwynedd

Bala Lake (Llyn Tegid) near the small town of Bala in Gwynedd in Wales in the United Kingdom.
Ellyn Tegid, known as Lake Bala in English, sit in the east of Snowdonia National Park ©Getty

Known in English as Lake Bala, Llyn Tegid is the largest natural lake in Wales – explore its banks and surrounding forests in the east of Snowdonia National Park with this 8.5-mile hike. Map and route.

7. Gwydir Castle, Llanrwst, Conwy

Wonder around the lush grounds of Gwydir Castle in Snowdonia
Wonder around the lush grounds of Gwydir Castle in Snowdonia ©Alamy
Stroll around this Tudor mansion and its former estate on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park in Wales’ northern region of Conwy. Route and Map.

8. Aber Falls, Gwynedd

View of Aber Falls in Showdonia National Park
Autumn encroaches on Aber Falls in Snowdonia ©Getty

Admire Aber Falls and discover the surrounding history and wildlife on this dramatic valley walk through the north-west fringes of Snowdonia National Park. Route and map.

9. Pen-y-Gwryd, Gwynedd

Mount Snowdon, the highest peak in Wales, towers above Llyn Tern
Mount Snowdon, the highest peak in Wales, towers above Llyn Tern ©Dave Porter

Follow in the footsteps of Hillary and Tenzing as they prepared to summit Mount Everest with a stay in their Snowdonia basecamp and a walk in the foothills of one of Britain’s best-loved peaks. Map and route.

10. Coed y Brenin, Gwynedd

Coed y Brenin waterfalls
Coed y Brenin waterfalls ©Getty

11. Harlech to Llandecwyn, Gwynedd

Bryn Cader Faner – or ‘The Welsh Crown of Thorns’ as it is often called – was described by archaeologist Aubrey Burl as one of the wonders of prehistoric Wales
Bryn Cader Faner – or ‘The Welsh Crown of Thorns’ as it is often called – was described by archaeologist Aubrey Burl as one of the wonders of prehistoric Wales ©Alamy

From the cylindrical towers of a 13th-century castle, ascend into the Snowdonia mountains to follow a prehistoric trackway to an extraordinary Bronze Age cairn. Route and map.

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Main image ©Getty